Randall’s Island ランダルズ島

Randall’s Island (cojoined with Ward’s islands) is separated from Manhattan island by the East River. This small joined island has functioned as the foundation for railway bridges from Manhattan to Long Island. There is also one pedestrian bridge linking it to Manhattan. The opposite bank here is Manhattan Island.

ランダルズ島はマンハッタン島からイーストリバー川で隔てられている。マンハッタンからロングアイランドへ渡る鉄道の橋脚の立つ小島として機能してきた。歩行者専用の橋も一つあり、歩いて行ける。対岸に見えるのはマンハッタン島。

In the last few years the island has been transformed into a large park. Since then, it has been very popular. Every weekend it is filled with picnickers. Here the opposite bank is Long Island.

島はこの数年間で大公園に作り替えられた。以来人々でにぎわう。週末はピクニックで埋まる。対岸に見えるのはロングアイランド島。

The island has had a varied past but was mostly used for power supply facilities, circus and sports events that required a large area. The photo below is a huge parking lot for that purpose. A black-and-white photograph can be beautiful, no matter how rough it is in reality.

島の中は人が住めず、ずっと電力供給施設の他、サーカスやスポーツの大面積を要するイベント以外には使われていなかった。下の写真はそのための巨大な駐車場。白黒写真にすればいくら荒れ果てていてもそれなりに美しい。手前は高速道路の橋脚。

We found a bicycle road under the railway bridge. Great space. Is there any other place like this? In fact we were here to explore a few years ago. We posted it on this blog and wrote about mysterious this location at that time. Some may remember citing Andrey Tarkovsky’s movie. Now, however, that feeling is gone. I feel a little sad.

その鉄道橋の下が自転車専用道路になっているのを見つけた。素晴らしい空間。こんなところが他にあるだろうか?実は数年前にもここに探検しに来ていた。このブログにも載せて、その幻想的な様子を書いた。タルコフスキーの映画、ノスタルジアを引き合いに出したのを覚えている人もいるかもしれない。今はしかし、そのような感じはなくなった。少し残念な気もする。

Mulberry trees are growing wild everywhere on the island. If the top of the road is a dirty purple, there is a mulberry tree there. We stopped and enjoyed a feast here for a while. They are very sweet. As soon as it is taken from the branch, it is carried to your mouth. The vibration causes the fruit to fall from the next branch. The leaves are eaten by silk moths, but no one eats the fruit. There is probably a reason for that. The fruit is so soft that it can’t be put into a box. It is more fragile than a raspberry. Just pick it up in the palm of your hand and it will collapse. It is impossible to put it on the market. (The bayberry is also too soft to find on the shelves of greengrocers in big cities, but still not so soft like this. I hunted bayberries alone in a park in Osaka, and the people around me looked at me like I was strange. They don’t know that bayberries are a treat.)

島には桑の木が至る所に自生している。道の上が紫色に汚れていたら、そこに桑の木がある。実は非常に甘い。僕らはここで、しばし桑の実取りに興じた。枝から採っては口に入れる。その振動で隣の枝から実がボロボロ落ちてきた。葉は蚕が食べるが、実は戦前ならいざ知らず、今は誰も食べない。それには多分理由がある。非常に実が柔らくて、手のひらに採っただけで潰れる。とても箱に入れられない。ラズベリーより弱い。市場に出すのは無理というもの。(ちなみに、ヤマモモも柔らかすぎて、大都市の八百屋の棚には出ないが、それでもこれほど柔らかくはない。前に大阪のある公園で一人、ヤマモモ狩りをやったが、周りの人が変な目で見ていた…まさか農薬の事を心配してくれてた?都会の人はヤマモモが御馳走なのを知らない。)

This island is really full of mulberry trees. All-you-can-eat with no pesticides. It’s really a waste that no one eats them. However, my hands are so sticky and messy that I can’t hold the camera. So that’s it for today’s blog post. We are in the middle of a trip, but I can’t help it. Today’s conclusion —-This island should be called Mulberry Island!

この島は本当に桑の木だらけ。無農薬でだれでも取り放題なのに、誰も食べないというのは本当にもったいない ( しかもここは他人がどう思おうと平気な米国だ)。だが、もう手がベチャベチャになってしまって、カメラを持てない。だから、今日のブログはこれまで。旅半ばだが仕方ない。本日の結論 —- この島は桑島=マルベリー島と呼ぶのがふさわしい!

Alice Tully Hall ジュリアード音楽院ホール

Our office is very close to the Julliard School where they frequently hold student concerts which are usually free. If the performance seems interesting we finish work early and walk to the theatre. Today is the last concert to be led by the conductor Joel Sachs. He has been teaching for decades, but now that he is over 80, he wants to do other things, such as playing the piano. Today’s venue is at one of the halls used by The Julliard school, Alice Tully Hall, which was recently transformed and revived by a major renovation.

私たちの事務所はジュリアード音楽院のすぐ近くにある。彼らは頻繁にコンサートを催していて、学生の演奏のときは大抵無料。面白そうな演目の日は早めに仕事を切り上げる。今日はサック氏という指揮の先生の最後のコンサートだという。数十年も教鞭をとっていたが、80歳を超えて、これからはピアノの演奏など、他の仕事をしたいのだそうな。今日の会場はジュリアードの中にあるホールの一つ、最近大改修で別の建物に生まれ変わったアリスタリーホール。

As soon as you enter, you can see that the design makes heavy use of streamlined forms. I think it’s pretty interesting, but on the other hand, it reminds me that theater design is really very difficult. In other words, no matter who designs it, it will look alike. There are strict requirements for acoustic performance and securing the number of seats, so the basics cannot be changed. While maximizing the number of seats, the stage must be visible past the head of the person sitting in front. The layout of the seats is also an important theme, but the design cannot be changed dramatically. This seating layout does not have a center aisle that would normally lead from the back of the hall to the stage. The only way to get to a seat is to go along the outside wall, and if your seat is in the center, 20 people have to stand one after another for you to get there. The space between the front and back of the seats is wider than in a typical hall, so it’s not impossible to walk, but it’s still difficult. This, however, would be the result of well-studied seating layouts.

中に入ればすぐに流線形を多用している意匠が見て取れる。かなり面白いと思うけれど、一方で、劇場のデザインは本当に難しいということを再認識させられる。つまり、誰がデザインしても、似たり寄ったりになる。音響性能や席数確保の厳しい要求があって、基本は変えられない。席数を最大にしつつ、前の席に座る人の頭を越えてステージが見えなくてはならない。席のレイアウトも重要なテーマだが、意匠は劇的に変えられない。この席のレイアウトには通常は最後部からステージに至るはずの廊下が無い。席に着くには壁のある壁沿いに入るしかなく、もし自分の席が中央ならば、20席の人々に次々に立ってもらって辿り着くしかない。前後の席の間隔は典型的なホールより広くて、歩けなくはないけれど、それでも大変。これらは、もちろん、十分研究された結果であろう。

The steps of the balcony seats would conflict with the streamlined image so only the smooth curves can be seen. However, if you look closely, you can see the steps like other halls. The floor of the balcony cannot be so steeply sloped, so it can’t be helped. To hide it, the balcony is painted black and blends into the black wall in the background. It’s a trick, so to speak.

滑らかな曲線だけが見えるようにするには、バルコニー席の段々が見えては都合が悪い。しかし、よく見ると他のホールと同じような段々が見える。バルコニーの床はスロープにできないので仕方がない。それを見せないようにするため、バルコニーは真っ黒に塗られて、背景の黒い壁に混じり込む。いわばトリックである。

Unless the biological feature that the human head is on the top and the body below supports it changes, a revolutionary new design cannot happen. After all, what depends on the designer is the superficial, so to speak, decorative parts of the hall. But if the guests can lie on their stomach and watch, that is, if they can watch with their head sticking out and their body extending in the opposite direction from the stage, the design may change considerably. Bed-like seats will be stacked to increase the number of seats, and there will be no strong distinction between top and bottom except on the stage.

人間の頭は一番上にあって、体はそれを支えるべく頭の下にあるという生物的特徴が変わらない限り、画期的に新しいデザインは変えられないだろう。結局、設計者によって変わるのは、表面的な、いわば装飾的な部分である。しかしもし、客が腹ばいになって寝そべって鑑賞できるならば、つまり、頭を突き出して体はステージから反対方向に延びるようにして鑑賞ができるならば、かなり変わるかもしれない。席数を増やすために、ベッドの様な席が積み重ねられれ、ステージ以外では、上下の強い区別がなくなるだろう。

On the other hand, the detailed design is very engaging. For example, how is this thin railing attached? A mystery. There is no space for inserting screws and supports. A special screw (like a pig’s nose) that the architect likes is used between the arm and the railing that touches the hand. Did that mean that the railing was fixed to the wall from the back, and then the whole wall panel was slammed onto the sleeves like a sword? Even so, I can’t find the mechanism to secure the panel to the wall.

一方、細かいデザインは非常に気張っている。たとえば、この細い手すりどうやって取り付けたのだろうか?ほとんどミステリー。ネジも腕木も差し込む隙間がない。腕木と手の触るパイプとの間には、建築家好みの特殊なネジが(豚の鼻みたい)使われている。という事は、手すりを壁に裏から固定しておいて、それで壁のパネルを袖に腕木を通すように、全体をヨイショッと差し込んだのだろうか?そうだとしても、パネルを壁に固定するための仕掛けが見つからない。

Oops the conductor appeared on the stage.The sound-absorbing tricks on the walls, the steps on the balconies, the screws on the railings are now invisible.The lights dimmed. A piece composed by a Julliard student began to play. It is softer and more subdued than the so-called contemporary music after WW2. Tonality is almost restored, and I’m no longer listening to music that sometimes sounds like noise or a horror movie. The program notes tells that the conductor was also a missionary to popularize “contemporary music” when he started teaching in the middle of the last century. The times have changed.

However, music is an aggregation of codes. How many people can now enjoy listening to Gagaku, which was popular as Japanese court music 1,000 years ago? Despite being highly developed in the court, no one in 10,000 would now enjoy it now (perhaps similar music based on the same code was heard as entertainment in rural areas). The majority of Japanese lost the decoder that they had in their heads. The first time the Japanese came into contact with Western music when the U.S. fleet’s military band landed in the middle of the 19th century, but (and by that time the Gagaku decoding machine was already lost) It was recorded that people were astonished by such a huge unpleasant noise. Even today’s pop music over the world based on European tonality can be enjoyed because people have a decoder for it in their brain.

おっとサック氏がステージに現れた。もう壁の吸音の仕掛けも、バルコニーの段々も、手すりのネジも…何もわからない。照明が暗転して、ジュリアードの学生の作曲した曲が流れ始めた。戦後のいわゆる現代音楽からだいぶ柔らかくなったものだと思う。かなり調性が散見されて、もう「ホラー映画の伴奏音楽」を聴いているようなことはない。前世紀半ば、彼が教え始めていた時は、彼も例の「現代音楽」普及の宣教師であったらしい。時代は変わったものだ。

尤も、音楽は暗号の塊である。1000年前の日本の宮廷音楽で人気あった雅楽を今聞いて楽しめる人がどれだけいるだろうか?宮廷で高度に発達したものの、(おそらく同じ暗号を基にしたよく似た音楽が農村でも娯楽として聞かていた)今では1万人に一人も楽しむ人はいないだろう。日本人の大多数が頭の中の解読機を失ったのである。今の西洋音楽を基本にしたポップミュージックも、人々は頭の中に解読機を持っているからこそ楽しめる。19世紀半ばに米国艦隊の軍楽隊が上陸の行進をした時が日本人が西洋音楽に接した最初であるが(その時にはすでに雅楽用の解読機は失われている)、わけのわからん、かしましい音楽に腰をぬかしたことが記録されている。

By the way, there is a theory that various forms of art are influenced by the zeitgeist and tend to be similar. Was modern architecture also diverging from the general understanding with the momentum of modernism, or was it something that only those who could decipher the cord, the rules for understanding, enjoy? I don’t think so, but maybe you don’t realize it if you are inside that world. Is the correction or change of architectural design the same as the way music has changed? You see a lot of “popular architecture” these day which has a WOW effect with the aid of 3 dimensional software, no need to decipher the chords to understand.

Applause to congratulate the conductor on his new start.

ところで、さまざまなアートの形式が時代精神の影響を受けて、互いに似通った傾向になるという理論がある。もしそうならば、現代建築もモダニズムの勢いで一般人の持つ暗号解読から乖離していたのだろうか?わかる人にはわかる、つまり理解するための隠れた決まり事・暗号を解読できる人にだけ楽しめる物であったのだろうか?そうではないと思うけれど、もしかしたら、その「業界」の内部にいると気が付かないのかもしれない。その可能性は十分ある。建築デザインも変わりつつあるが、音楽の世界と似た方向に変わりつつあるのだろうか?このごろ、コンピュータの3次元ソフトの力を借りて、ワオっすごい!となる「ポピュラー建築」がたくさん建ってきた。頭の中に解読機はなくても理解できるというものだ。

彼の新しい門出を祝福する拍手が鳴りやまない。

ーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーー

postscript  後記

The previous hall was designed as a typical modernist monument. There was a large lobby on the ground floor, but it didn’t feel like it was inviting those walking down the street to enter.

改修以前のホールはモダニズムの典型といったデザインであった。一階に大きなロビーは在ったが、通りを歩く人々を招き入れるという感じではなかった。

On the contrary, the renovation plan was developed to show the bustle of performance night to the city and to invite more audience, with no wall between the lobby and the front sidewalk, connecting to the street directly. The excited audience waiting for the concert to open and leaving the hall after the show are now visible from the street.

そこで、改修案は毎晩の賑わいを街へ見せつけ、さらなる観客を招くべく、ロビーと正面の歩道との間は透明にして、まるで通りから一つながりにすることが意図された。開演を待つ人々や, お開きになってどっと街に繰り出す聴衆の高揚感が街にあふれ出る。

An award from AISC もう一つの受賞

This staircase that we designed received an award from the American Steel Construction Association. It was pure luck that it coincided with the award from our previous blog post “Designer’s Loft”. The name of the award is a bit long, the “Innovative Design of Engineering and Architecture with Structural Steel (IDEAS²) Award! “. The project is called “Ascension of the Celestial Maiden “. Inspired by the legend of the ascension of beauty, which is universal throughout the world. It is an application of origami. Contrary to its romantic name, there are no decorative parts, and the design is completed with heavy and hard structural steel.

私たちのデザインした階段が米国鉄鋼建設協会から受賞した。前々回のブログ記事「デザイナーのロフト」の受賞と重なったのはまったくの偶然。賞の名は、ちょっと長いが、「構造用鋼による工学と建築の革新的なデザイン(IDEAS²)賞」!私たちはこの階段を「天女の昇天」と名付けた。世界中に遍在する羽衣伝説をインスピレーションにして、それにオリガミの応用をしたもの。ロマンチックな名に反して装飾的な鉄の部分は一切なく、重くて固い構造用の鋼鉄だけで意匠が完結している。

When climbing a normal staircase, the view to the front is blocked by a structure that supports the staircase and you cannot see through it. We wanted you to see beyond the stair, creating a floating feeling. To make it look light and stabilize it structurally was the challenge. In other words, how do you get closer to the feeling of a fluttering ribbon? How to solve this technically? The headquarters of the United Nations is now clearly visible between the completed treads. High precision is required in the production process but it was created in a simple and magical manner; that is another reason for the award. For more information please watch the video that was presented to the jury.

通常の階段は登るときに、前方は階段を支える構造で塞がっていて前は見えない。けれど、それを見通せるようにしつつ、いかに浮遊するような上昇感をつくり、軽く見せつつ、構造的に安定させるかというのが挑戦だった。つまり、羽衣のヒラヒラの感じにいかに近づけるか?それを技術的に解決するという課題。今、完成した段の間から、ニューヨーク国連本部の建物がくっきり見えている。制作工程で高い精度が要求されるが、それをエイヤッとクリアする画期的なアイデアが裏にあるのも受賞の理由。詳しくは審査に使われたビデオをご高覧を。

The following is from the press release when the association announced the winners.

“Nine projects, ranging from a cutting-edge Seattle skyscraper to a sophisticated staircase in a private New York home, represent the most innovative aspects of today’s design and construction industries. The industry has made it very difficult for our judges to select winners among an outstanding pool of submissions. It’s truly inspiring to see the ways today’s most creative minds work with structural steel to create modern landmarks. ”

以下は協会の受賞プレスリリースより、

「シアトルの最先端の超高層ビルからニューヨークの個人宅の洗練された階段まで、9つのプロジェクトが、今日の設計および建設業界の最も革新的な側面を表している。昨今は山のように集まった優れた応募作品の中からさらに受賞者を選ぶのが非常に困難になっている。 今日の最も創造的な頭脳が構造用鋼を使って現代のランドマークを作成する方法を見るのは本当に刺激的である。

They also published the winners projects. This staircase was a introduces in a past post and was taken up as a project to connect the upper and lower floors with a new opening. Please visit this post for more information.

協会は受賞作品の出版もしたので、こちらもご高覧ください。 この階段は過去のポストにて、上階と下階を大穴で繋げるプロジェクトとして紹介済。全体の様子はそのポストをご覧ください。

Parking Lot City Anan 駐車場都市-阿南

The photographs of the countryside in Japan that are said to be scenic, are so to speak, over-consumed images. Everyone finds them beautiful, but everyone has already seen them in the media and nothing is fresh. In this blog, we have been introducing scenery that is not special, scenery that is maybe too plain for the locals, but beautiful scenery (I think) if you look at it with fresh eyes. The plum orchard that we posted recently is an example. But unfortunately this time photos may not be beautiful. This city borders a national park and has a beautiful view, but once you enter the city, you can see what has become a typical ugly, super messy townscape.

日本の景勝地と言われる土地の写真はいわば判じ絵である。誰もが美しいと感じるが、誰もがすでに広告や本で見たことがあって、発見はない。このブログではそのような特別な景色ではなくて、地元の人には当たり前の景色、しかし改めて見れば美しい(と思う)景色を紹介してきた。前々回に載せた梅林園はその一例。残念ながら今回はそういかないかもしれない。ここは国定公園に接していて、そこには美しい景色があるが、いったん市街に入ると、これまた判じ絵のごとく、典型的な殺風景が広がる。

The city once prospered as a castle town and a local stop along the old inter city road. However, a new road bypassed the narrow old road, another bypass of it, and another bypass of the first one, and the city is steadily moving away from the old center. Now the old shops are almost wiped out, the shutters of the shops are all closed. There are now only 2 “machiya” shops left to imagine what the street view looked like when it was the heart of the city.

街はかつて旧街道沿いに城下町・地方都市として栄えていた。しかし、狭い旧街道を迂回する新道、それを迂回するバイパスができ、さらにそのまたバイパスが出来て、街の中心が旧市街からどんどん離れて行ってしまった。今、古い商店はほぼ全滅、商店のシャッターは全部閉まっている。かつては以下のような町やが甍を連ねていたのだか、今はこの二軒で想像するしかない。

These photos were taken around 4 pm on weekdays. It’s not a weekend, nor is it early in the morning before the city wakes up. ここに載せた写真はかつては最も繁華であった地区でとったもの。すべて週日の午後4時ぐらいにとられたもので、週末でもなければ、早朝、街が目覚める前でもない。

It’s just a 1-minute walk from the most popular railway station. There are vacant lots like missing teeth between the shops with the shutters closed. They are the sites of former stores that have become parking lots. I was stunned to see how many parking lots actually existed when I plotted them on the map of the old city center.

ここは、ひとけの最もあるはずの鉄道駅の目の前、駅前から歩いてわずか1分のところ。シャッターを閉じた商店の間に歯が抜けたように空き地が点在している。かつての商店の跡である。ここには駐車場がどのくらいあるのだろうか? 旧市街中心部の地図にプロットしてみて、唖然とした。

In the oldest area along the historic main street lined with shops, 39% of the ground is parking (in orange), and in the next oldest area along the main street, 30% is parking (in yellow). The expanded city area from the time when the first new road was built, 20% is parking (in blue), and in the latest expanded area, 20% is parking (in light blue). Scattered agricultural sites in the newest area, will soon join the parking, it is only a matter of time before this area is also 30% parking, the same as the older city. It can be called a “parking lot city”, but it would be more appropriate to say that buildings are erected on a huge parking lot.

商店が立ち並んでいた旧街道沿いの最も中心だった地区(オレンジ色)では地面の39%が、その旧街道に沿う次に古い地域(黄色)では25%、最初の新道の周りに拡大された市街地区(青)とさらに最も新しく市街に加わった地域(水色)では20%が駐車場になっている。ここでは、まだ農地が点在していて、これらが駐車場に代わり、30%以上になるのは時間の問題だろう。駐車場都市とも言っても良い。いわば巨大な駐車場の中に建物がポツポツと建っていると言った方が適切ではないだろうか?

If you try Google Street View, you’ll find that these are not carefully selected photos showing parking lots. If you actually walk down the street, parking lots will appear one after another. The decline of the old heart of the local city is a common problem (for various reasons) all over the world, but the situation is extreme here. “Urban planning” assumed that cities are expanding, but that is not the case here. The mayor is studying how to solve this.

グーグルのストリートビューを試してみれば、駐車場ばかりの場所ばかりを選んで撮った写真でないのが分かるはず。実際に通りを歩けば、駐車場が次々と現れてくる。旧市街地が寂れるのは(様々な理由で)世界中の地方都市で共通な現象だが、ここでは極端。これまでの都市計画は都市が拡大することを暗黙に仮定していた。そもそも「都市計画」とは用途地区の指定を意味するだけで、街の未来像を研究することではなかった。都市全体(あるいはその大きな部分)が縮んでゆくときどうするか?市長は計画案を研究しはじめている。

The scene above is in front of the railway station which is supposed to be most vigorous spot in the city. When it was busy, people would go out into the streets, talk to their neighbors, and hang out without any particular purpose. There was a kind of daily enjoyment and refreshment. Is it fun to walk here now? Now people go out on the street only when they have a specific need.

上の写真は駅前のようす。ここがにぎわっていた時は、人々は通りに出て、近所の人と話をしたり、用もなくてもぶらついたのではないか?一種の日常の楽しみ、気晴らしがあったと思う。今、ここを歩いてそんな気分になるだろうか?人々は用があるときのみ通りに出る。

People living here seem to have given up on obtaining a beautiful living space. But that’s actually not the case. In some parts of the city, I found trees planted, though they were tucked away in unnoticeable locations. Even with tiny leftover land, people are looking for a beautiful environment. Trees are planted in the corners of the parking lots and in unusable land, where residents have maximized income by making it a parking lot. If each person thinks of the city as his/her own garden and strategically planted trees in the city, the relaxed life will return. Of course, the city can help the activity. What about a communal vegetable garden? Will the city come back to life from there? I think there is a possibility. Wouldn’t it be possible to survive as a beautiful residential area, not a commercial area?

ここに生きる人はもう美しい生活空間を諦めたかのように見える。が、そうではない。街のところどころで、目立たないけれど、木々が植えられているのをみつけた。猫の額であっても自分の土があるところに美しい環境を求める気持ちが生きている。建物の跡を駐車場にして収入を最大にしつつも、駐車場の片隅や使えない土地には木が植えられている。ならば、一人ひとりが街を自分の庭のようにとらえて、さらに市が街中に戦略的に木を植えていけば、うるおいが戻るのではないか?さらに駐車場の代わりに共同の菜園や庭作りはどうだろう?そこから街の活気が戻らないだろうか?可能性はあると思う。商業地区としてではなく、うるおいのある住居地区として生き残れるのではないか?

Imagine the city in such a landscape. And if the city can’t create a vitality of its own, it would be a good idea to have people come from outside. Remember the national park starts here, wouldn’t it be possible for many people to stop by in this gateway town? If the city is relaxed, enjoyable, and beautiful you will visit it. For that purpose, economic activity is not always necessary. People from outside will skip this town because it’s getting easier and easier to get to their final destination on the newest highway. You need to plan. Couldn’t it be a station town for people who want slow traveling, such as those who travel by bicycle? Tourists rushing in by car will exhaust the National Park. This idea also will take advantage of the national park and maintain it as a sustainable resource by preventing over-tourism.

街中がこのような景色でみたされた様子を想像してほしい。さらに、外から活力を持って来てもらうのも、戦略の一つであろう。ここから国定公園がはじまるのを活用できなか?その玄関町として、旅行客に寄ってもらえるのではないだろうか。街がしっとりと美しく、滞在が楽しいものならば、人が来てくれる。そのためには必ずしも経済的な活力は必要であるまい。高速道路で一機に目的地に着くのがますます簡単になっているから、目的地しか興味のない人々はこの町をパスするだろう。しかし、ゆっくり訪ね来る人々、例えば自転車旅行をする人々は宿場として利用するのではないか?大量の車が押し寄せて国定公園とそのアクセス路を疲弊させるようなことはない。このアイデアは国定公園を利用させてもらいつつ、逆に国定公園内のオーバーツーリズムを防いで、サステイナブルな資源として未来に残すのにも役立つだろう。

AIA Award 米国建築家協会賞

One of our projects, “Designer’s Loft” received an award from the American Institute of Architects New York. Today is the opening of the show of the winner’s works at the Center for Architecture in New York.

私たちのプロジェクトの1つ「デザイナーのロフト」が、米国建築家協会 AIANewYorkから賞を受けた。 今日は、ニューヨークの建築センターで受賞作品の展覧会のオープニング。

Many of our previous clients came to celebrate, they sounded proud of the results of the projects we collaborated together on. It was great to see them.…. It was a rainy hot and humid evening- to mask or not to mask? So hard to communicate and enjoy a glass of wine with a mask on.

これまでのクライアントがたくさん集まってくれた。彼らは私たちと一緒にやったプロジェクトの結果を自慢したいみたい…光栄です。しかし雨が降って、蒸し暑い夜…マスクするか、それともしないか? マスクをつけてのコミュニケーションは難しく、グラスワインを楽しむのはとても無理。

The Designer’s Loft was designed for a fashion designer who uses it as a showcase for his designs, as well as a welcoming space to meet friends and customers. The loft has a long footprint but very little natural light, the challenge was to use the light in creative ways to emphasize the height and spaciousness. Our strategy was to provide several key elements to solve multiple issues simultaneously, interwoven to address the whole. You can visit the AIA’s website. 

https://www.aiany.org/architecture/featured-projects/view/designers-loft/

「デザイナーのロフト」は、ファッションデザイナーがそのデザインのショーケースとして使用するのために設計されたもの。また、友人や顧客との出会いの場にもなる。 ロフトの床面積は細長くて、自然光は奥まで届かない。チャレンジであったのは、高さと広さを強調するために創造的な方法で光を使用することだった。 私たちの戦略は、複数の問題を同時に解決するためのいくつかの重要なエレメントを織り交ぜ、全体に寄与させることであった。詳しくはAIAのウェブサイトにて。

https://www.aiany.org/architecture/featured-projects/view/designers-loft/

You can also visit our website for more information 私達のウェブサイトでは、さらに詳しく…。https://www.yoshiharamckee.com/PROJECTS/commercial/7e17.html

You may not have noticed, but that Hiroki is smiling in his heart. He says it is really difficult to smile artificially… nothing funny here.  お気づきにならないかもしれないが、ヒロキは心の中で微笑んでいる。曰く、何もおかしいことがないのに、無理やり人工的に笑うことは本当にむつかしい…。

Plum orchard 梅林園

I have visited this valley several times but a bit later in the season. It seems that the plum blossoms are a little late this year. They are still fragrant, but the blossoms are scattered, and if you are not careful you will miss them. On the other hand, it seems that the cherry blossoms have bloomed a little early. Normally, plum blossoms and cherry blossoms do not overlap. This year seems to be an odd year, where fragrant plums and spectacular cherries mingle. There are many similar valleys nearby, but this is the only one that has become a plum orchard. Other valleys have cedar and cypress forests which have been planted to provide an income, but this valley has many areas that have been left to the natural forest and the plum trees.

数年前にもここへ来ていた。季節はもう少し後。今年はウメの花は少し遅かったらしい。鼻を近づけると、強い芳香がしてくる。しかし、梅の花はちらほらで、注意しないと見逃してしまう。一方、桜の開花は少し早かったらしい。通常はウメと桜の開花は重ならない。今年はまれな年らしい。同じような谷が近くにたくさんあるのだが、梅林園になっているのはここだけ。谷がもっと大きければスギやヒノキの林産のほうが適しているのかもしれない。

The valley is as well-maintained as a garden because it is in the hands of farmers who pick the plum fruit. Perhaps the effort and profits are (somehow) balanced. If it were to make a big profit, there would have been many plum orchards in other valleys.

庭園のように手入れが良くされていて、整っているのは、梅の実を取る農家の手がはいっているからだ。おそらく、手間と収益が(何とか)バランスが取れているのだろう。もし、大きな収益が上がるなら、他の谷にもたくさん梅林ができていただろう。

Today is Sunday, but no one is here. It has been known as a spot to visit for a long time, but what happened? A few weeks ago, when a lot of the plums were in bloom, some groups of older people were coming. It is not recognized as a place for cherry blossoms, so no matter how beautiful the cherry blossoms are, no one will come. If there is no name, you don’t  go, on the other hand if it has a name you will visit. There must be a cycle in which more visitors come and the name rises again. Is it a vicious cycle or a virtuous cycle? I prefer the time when people don’t come, so I choose to visit such places. There is always a long line at our local bagel shop in New York, but I don’t really want to buy bagels in that store. Perverse?

今日は日曜、しかし誰もいない。昔から小名所として、知られてるのだが、どうしたのだろう?数週間前、梅がたくさん咲いていた時は老人たちのグループがきていたという。桜の名所としては認識されてないので、いくら桜が美しくても、誰も来ないのかも。知名度がないと、行楽に供しなくなるのだろう。反対に知名度があると、さらにたくさんの行楽客がきて、また知名度が上がるという、循環があるに違いない。それが好循環なのか、悪循環なのか?私は人の来ない時期の方が好きで、そういうところを選んで訪れる。ニューヨークにいつも長蛇の列ができているベーグル屋があるが、並んでまでその店のベーグルを食べたいとは全く思わない。天邪鬼?

Previously, many people would join together to make a car trip and visit here. Now everyone has their own car, but consider this orchard as too minor to come all the way by car to visit. In fact, if a lot of cars come, the orchard will become “car parking”. Then what about a bicycle? If the road to this point does not overlap with car traffic, anyone can enjoy a leisurely half-day excursion. Also, if you can go to a similar quiet scenic spot near this, you can make a nice day trip.

昔は車を仕立ててここまで来る人がたくさんあった。今はだれも自家用車を持っているものの、車で来るには地味すぎるのだろう。実際たくさん車が来たら、梅林が車で埋まってしまう。それなら自転車ならどうだろうか。もしここまで来る道行きが自動車交通と重ならなければ、だれでも、ゆっくりと半日の小旅行が楽しめる。また同じような静かな行楽地にハシゴできるなら、一日小旅行が出来るのでは?

I made a map of the idea of ​​connecting such places. そのような場所をつなぐアイデアを地図にした。

TinyURL.com/tokushimamapproposal/

This map is quite different from the typical route map, it does not recommend the shortest route, some times the route zigs and zags and has detours. Avoiding car traffic it takes you on:  この地図は通常のと観光ルートマップとは違い、早く着くことが目的ではないので、多少遠回りでも、ジグザグでも構わない。幹線道路を避けて、

  • historical old routes, 歴史的な街道 
  • quiet obsolete roads left after the new bi-pass, 無数の静かな旧道(新道ができたおかげ)
  • banks of rivers 海岸や川の土手、
  • farming roads 農道

all stitched together.You can enjoy beautiful scenes safely not paying any attention to car traffic. You will find something you never find on a car trip. をつないでいる。車交通を気にすることなく景色のいいところ、安心して行ける。逆に、車では決して経験できない四国を見ることができるはず。

Cherry Blossom in NY 花見のニューヨーク

This year it feels like spring came earlier, the cherries and magnolias are blooming at the same time and the forsythia is blossoming too. They normally are distinguished by the timing of when they bloom but this spring we cannot distinguish them from a distance. It is a rare feeling to see both at the same time. Just an hour before the sunset, already many people had left but still there are a lot of people in Central Park lingering and enjoying the blooms. Now there are no tourists but what if they had joined? These are all locals enjoying their park.

 今年の春は早く来た。モクレン、コブシ、桜、通常は花が咲く時期がずれるのに、今年は一斉に咲きだした。ピンクのモクレンと桜は遠くからでは区別できない。セントラルパークは珍しい雰囲気。薄曇りの日没ちょっと前、すでにかなりの人が帰ったはずだが、それでも人でいっぱい。地元の人ばかりで、もし観光客も来ていたら、どんなに混雑していただろうか?

There was every kind of party; lovers, family and friends, all ages, all gender, all races. The party above is speaking a language we don’t know, not English and not Spanish. They took off the shoes!

性別、年齢、人種問わずの、恋人同士、家族づれから数人の友人グループまで、多種多様。上の写真はたまたま、横を通り際に目にしたパーティー。知らない言葉ではしゃぐ娘たち。英語でもないし、スペイン語でもない。日本人みたいに靴を脱いでいる。一体どこ出身なんだろう?

This party speaks perfect English. They are dressed up and made up, taking pictures of each other. The branch they are on seems like it is not high enough. Of course no alcohol, but the spring is making them wilder. They are challenging to reach the next one.

こちらも別の若い女性たちだが、話しているのは完璧な英語。イスラムのヒシャブをかぶっている。娘たちだけなのはそのためか?着飾って、化粧も厚めにして、写真の取り合いっこに興じる。背丈より高い枝も物足りずとみえて、次の枝まで登ろうと…。もちろんアルコールはご法度だろうけれど、春は彼女らを大胆にさせる。じろじろ見続けるわけにはいかないけれど、目が離せない。

We looked for an empty cherry tree. But they are all taken. The canopy of flowers is a universally preferred space. We sort of gave up and toasted with our wine and cheese from close by.  An illusion that we are in Japan enjoying the ephemeral spring came to me, but wait a minute there are none of those popular harsh blue plastic sheets.

僕らも、二人でピクニックをすべく、桜の真下を探したのだけれど、どの木もすでに取られてしまっている。桜の傘の下が好まれるのは日本だけかとおもったら、実は普遍的に好まれる空間なのだ。何とか、ここでまあ良いかという所を見つけて、持ってきたワインとチーズで春をめでる。一瞬、日本にいる錯覚を覚えた。ちょっと待て、あのブルーシートがない!日本の花見は、どぎつい青色によって朧な春を締め出さなければ、「正統」の花見が成立しない。

On our way back , we saw a lot of temporary sheds built by restaurants in the parking lanes along the streets. In our last blog post we wondered where the customers would go in midwinter, in fact they did not go anywhere. We saw many people in these sheds even in real freezing temperatures. They are locals, not from Siberia or Alaska. We admired how determined New Yorker’s love their restaurants and chatting. Although they don’t need that determination tonight.

帰途は多少酔っぱらって自転車専用レーンを下る。沿道のレストランが建てた仮設小屋が車道の両端に連なっている。去年の秋に書いたブログでは真冬になったらレストラン客達はどうするんだろうと書いたけれど、その後、零下の凍った小屋で、ワインを飲んでいる客をたくさん見た。ニューヨーカーのレストラン好き、おしゃべり好きは並大抵ではない。彼らはシベリアやアラスカから観光で来たわけではない…地元の人々。想像を絶する根性と言べきかもしれない。しかし今夜はもう、根性はいらない。ちなみに自転車専用レーンはこの小屋の列と歩道の間にある緑の帯。

An island in Shikoku 四国の右下 出羽島

double click to brow up ダブルクリックで拡大

I knew this island was very close when I was a child but I have never been here. Until a friend invited me to visit I hardly thought about this island. The 2km of shoreline has a beautiful oval shape. The island has a population of 70 in this fisherman’s village. There is a small boat commuting for 15min between the main island 6 times a day.

灯台もと暗しとはこのことか 。建築家の友人が先日招いてくれるまで、ほとんど何も知らなかった。島は全周約2k余りのきれいな楕円形で人口70人の漁村である。上の写真の対岸の四国本島から15分、一日6往復の連絡船が出ている。

There is no doctor and no children now. If you see young people they are weekend fishermen from outside. The old school now is just a platform for an emergency helicopter.

かつての小学校跡は今は津波避難所になっている。その校庭は今は救急ヘリコプターの着陸施設になっている。無医村。子供たちは数年前に居なくなった。今、若者を見かけたら、まず釣り客である。

The island belongs to a semitropical zone. Some palm trees are growing here. The invisible border between the semitropical and temperate zones is between this island and the main Shikoku Island.

島にはヤシの木が植わっている。ここは亜熱帯だそうな。温帯との見えない境界線が四国本島との間にあるらしい。

The island preserves some traditional houses from a century ago, though the conditions are not good. My friend is an architect who is volunteering his time to repair one of the houses.  There are no drawings left, over time several renovations were done so that now no one knows what it was like when it was built, which is the ultimate goal of this preservation. He uses his experience and his speculation based on the remainders of the renovated construction, the choice of material and the customary way of house building at the time. The process is a chain of finding evidence, hypothesizing, and finding more evidence to prove that again…a total forensic study in a detective story. The architect comes here after 3 hours drive from his office.

島には古い伝統的建築物に指定された民家がたくさん残っている。しかし状態は良くない。建築家である友人はその一つの修復保存の面倒を見ている。新築当時のデザインに修復するのがゴールなのだが、設計図はないし、何度も改修を重ねているので、昔のデザインがどうであったか、にわかにはわからない。柱や梁の加工の痕跡、材の扱い方、当時の慣習などから経験を通して推論してゆく。それはまるで犯罪捜査の鑑識のごとく。現場に残された証拠から仮説を立てて、さらに裏付けを探す。その繰り返し。彼はこのボランティアのために、毎回3時間かけて、この島に辿りつく。

Here is a philosophical dilemma. If you precisely save the old structure, the house will collapse in the next big earthquake which is considered to hit here very soon. The last hit was a long time ago and the earth has built up a large preserve of energy by now. Then what is the meaning of this preservation of cultural heritage? It is a lie to reinforce the structure in the modern manner. So what to do? This is a practical problem.

ここに哲学的な難題が横たわっている。昔の建て方を忠実に再現すると、大きな地震に耐えられない。前回の南海大地震からだいぶ時間が経っているので、次のは数年のうちに来るだろうと噂されている。せっかく税金を投入して文化遺産を守っても、明日地震が来て倒壊するなら意味がないではないか。だが、構造を強くするのは嘘になる。ではどうすればいいのか?お金もないことだし、ぎりぎりの線で構造補強をしているのだという。これは机上の哲学的問題なんてものではなくて、大工たちに今すぐ指示しないといけない、待った無しの問題なのだ。

The side of the island facing to Shikoku island is for fishing boats and houses, but the ocean side is hilly and covered with natural forest and an undistributed ocean view. The highest point of the island is in the center and has a small lighthouse and an abandoned viewing platform.

島の四国本島に面する側は湾になっていて漁船と民家で埋まっている。一方、反対側では急な小道をへて、原生林の間に、遮るもののない太平洋が臨める。真ん中に位置する最高点には小さな灯台と壊れた展望デッキがある

The quay is the center of the village, everyone comes and chats about the day’s catch and mends their fishing nets. This piazza like space is very unusual in Japan. There is a quiet but vibrant life, not like most local towns in Japan where the center is just an intersection. A woman who used to run a shop that faced the quay passed by and we chatted… I don’t remember what we talked about. This happens to be the city center but it is also the quay, the public life and fishing life overlap on this small island.

港の岸壁は村びとの生活の中心で、皆なここを通る。普通の町や村では中心はただの交差点に過ぎない。ここは日本では珍しい広場空間ではないだろうか?ここで毎日の漁の成果を話し、網の手入れをする。静かだが、賑わいがある。村の中心になるところはこの岸壁しかない。かつて、ここに面して一軒の店が開いていたという。その店主のおばあさんが通りかかって、お喋りをしていった。何を話したのか?忘れてしまった。

On the island there are 2 inns, one is just for sleeping and the other one provides 2 meals (of course all from today’s catch) for 6000 yen (60 usd). They will make accommodation for you after you call for a reservation. A spontaneous visit may provide nothing.

島には民宿が2つ、素泊まりのみの一軒と二食付きで一泊6千円の宿がある。ほとんど鳴ることのない電話予約を受けて、やおら準備が始まるのだろう、いきなり行っては、何もないにちがいない。

There are no policemen here. So the main boulevard becomes a woodworking shop. What is wrong to have a party even in the daytime? Anyway there are no cars nor even bicycles in the island. I captured a couple of happy men at the corner of the angle, pretending I am taking a picture of the house beside of them.

島には警官はいない。だから、家の前の大通りで日曜大工の店を開いても平気だし、昼間からいっぱいやれるというものだ。もとより、車はおろか、自転車の一台さえ島にはない。気づかれないよう、去年改修が終わった家の写真を撮っているふりをして、人生を楽しむ上機嫌の二人をアングルの角に収めた。

How many islands like this are there in Japan? It is quietly isolated in the ocean. A half day is probably enough to explore this tiny island, but I want to come back and stay overnight. Time will flow differently here.

こういう孤島は日本にどのくらいあるのだろう。島は人に知られずに、静かに海に浮かんでいる。島内を一巡するのは半日あれば十分だけれど、一泊してみたいと思う。別の時間が流れるに違いない。

When we are leaving the island, a fisherman handed a bunch of beautiful lobsters to the architect, apologizing that normally he can get bigger ones. There is a blow of the steam whistle from the boat. We must go…. A couple, the only tourists today were on the edge of the island on the other side of the bay. They understood immediately what was happening and started a “once in a lifetime” dash. Our boat saw them and returned to the quay. The couple’s hearts were bursting…. I hope not.

我々が島を去る時、一人の漁師がその日取れた伊勢エビ数匹を、小さいけれど、と言い訳しながら、この友人に差し出した。普段はもっと大きなのが採れるらしい。連絡船の汽笛が鳴っている。もう行かないと…。船着き場と反対側の島の端から、この日唯一の観光客カップルが現れ出た。何が起こっているのか一瞬に理解して、一世一代の掛けっこが始まった。連絡船はそれを見て、ゆっくりと岸壁に戻った。カップルの心臓は今にも破裂するのだそうな。

 

Scientific Literacy 科学文盲率

Two months ago, we talked about how restaurants in NYC are surviving in the pandemic by converting the parking lanes into dinning space for their restaurants. They had just started at that time, so the settings were rather primitive and raw.

2月ほど前、この欄にニューヨークのレストランがいかにして、このパンデミックを生き残ろうとしているか?テーブルを道路の駐車レーンにおいてㇾストランの一部として使いだしたことを載せた。その時はまだ始まったばかりで、取り急ぎの粗末な感じであった。

Now they are getting fancy and permanent looking. The sidewalks have been taken over as dining areas. Pedestrians pass through the middle of the dinners. It reminds me of the streets in Europe…messy and vibrant. In fact, some parts are a bit too vibrant, they are too narrow for pedestrians to go through. You may get the virus from enthusiastic guests chatting at the tables.  One bonus is you get to see what they are eating- staring at their food is allowed.

それが今、しっかりとした、上等なものになって, 歩道がレストランに占拠されつつある。事実上、歩道はレストランの真ん中を走っている。なんだかヨーロッパのおしゃれな街で、にぎやかな雑踏の中か、カフェの前を歩いているような錯覚を覚える。実際、場所によるとイキが良すぎる。通り抜けるのに一苦労する狭さで、レストランの客からウィルスを貰うかもしれない。不幸中の幸いは、通常はレストランでどんな料理が出るのかわからなかったのが、今は良く見えること。

The biggest difference is the new roofs that have appeared. Guests need shelter when the weather is rainy or windy. Additionally, it is getting cooler now. We wonder how will they accept dinners in the winter, what will be the next layer? I understand it is the time for them to make money to maintain the business before winter. It also may be the time for us to show our tolerance … except when it comes to catching the virus.

一番大きな変化はどこも屋根が付いたこと。雨の日や風の強い日もこれで大丈夫。それに寒くなってきている。だが冬はどうするのだろう?もう一枚外套を着こむのだろうか?パンデミック下の商売のかき入れ時は、今なのだ。そして我々にとっても、歩くのが少し不便であっても、文句を言わない寛容さを持つのは今なのだ…ウィルスを移される意外は。 

There were several reports about people who refuse to wear masks saying that no one can force you to wear one. Probably they misunderstand that mask wearing is the same as wearing a bike helmet. If a traffic accident kills them without a helmet, it is their own responsibility, nobody gets hurt… except themselves. With the same reasoning they also may protest the obligation of wearing a seat belt. No authority has the power to force you. This is wrong, the mask is not just for you but also for someone in front of you. You may transfer the virus to someone because very often you don’t even know if you are already infected or not. The mask is not the same as a helmet or seat belt!

マスク着用の義務づけを拒否する人々の報道がいくつもある。その理由は自由な国で誰もマスク着用を強制できないというもの。たぶん彼らはマスクがヘルメット同じだと混同しているのだろう。もし無着用で交通事故で死んでも、それは自業自得で、だれも迷惑になるわけでもない。同じ理由でシートベルトの着用義務に反対できるかもしれない…。しかし、これは間違っている。マスクは自分のためだけではなくて、目の前にいる人のためでもある。自分が感染しているかどうかわからないのだから、マスクなしでは誰かにウィルスを移す可能性が非常に高い。マスクはヘルメットやシートベルトとは違う。

This inconvenient fact has been informed to everyone so often and so widely. It is a mystery that some people have not read it? or they don’t trust any information from outside? But do they have any alternative counter theory that they can support scientifically? Did they investigate their own counter theory carefully? In fact, it is a foundation of science to doubt any authority, but you need to create a plausible counter idea and study it with a critical manner if you think the authority is wrong. You need to have the capacity to welcome a disliked theory and have the ability to examine it. You cannot just blindly dismiss. This is another foundation of science.

このウィルスの都合の悪い事実は広く何度も人々に知らされたはず。彼らはこれを読まなかったなんてことがあるだろうか?それとも、権威者から与えられた情報は信用しないのか?しかし、そうだとしても、彼らには反論できる別の科学的根拠があるようには思えない。注意深く自身の反論要旨を吟味したであろうか?実際、権威を疑うことは科学の基本である。権威を認めないならば、代案を構築して、批判的に検証しなければならない。さらに、他者からの反論を歓迎して、自分の考えを照査する力がなければならない。ただ嫌いだというだけの理由で却下できない。これはもう一つの科学の基礎である。

Although, the authorities may need to reconsider how to inform everyone. The social distance varies with wind speed, direction, temperature, humidity, in shade or not and the strength of speech, so it cannot be simply 6ft, obviously. They might have underestimated the ability of the general public to consider this judging it is too complicated for them. In some cases 6ft is too much, and vise versa.There was no explanations how 6 ft was derived, no information that the size of droplet carrying virus is 1/1000 -1/100 millimeter and typical fiber mesh of mask is about 5/1000 millimeter ( sorry for imperial system users), it is like “believe me blindly”. But you have internet and if you think a little bit, you will understand that you don’t need to go down into the car lane to avoid me walking 20 ft in front of you (this actually happened often). Can people think scientifically, or the authorities’ underestimation is correct? It is a hard question to answer, but obviously the virus carried on the air cannot propagate with the speed of light.

しかし、当局側にも非があるかもしれない。ウィルスを移されない距離は風の向きや、強さ、気温、湿度、日陰かそうでないか、話者の発音の強さによって変わるはずで、6フィート一律ではありえない。当局は、そんな複雑なことを言ってもわからないだろうと、人々の考える力を過小評価している。これらの条件しだいで、もっと近くでも安全だし、その反対もあろう。ウィルスの大きさがどのくらいで、マスクの繊維の径がどのくらいなのかも、6 フィート がどのようにして導き出されたのかも、とこにも説明はなかった。まるで、とにかく鵜呑みにせよと言っているみたいではないか。しかしインターネットはあるんだし、少し考えてみれば、20フィートも前から、近づく私を避けて、車道に降りる必要もない(これは実際に時々起こる)。人々は本当に考える力がないのか?それとも当局の過小評価が間違っているのか?答えつらい問いだが、しかし明らかに、空気に乗っているウィルスは光の速度で伝播できない。

Glick Park グリック公園

DSC01092

Our local park, Glick Park was closed for almost 2 years for “renovation” and reopened this spring- after almost 2 years of not being able to access the park it has suffered; many plants did not survive. The parks are heavily used now by New Yorkers looking for outdoor space to relax, play and use as alternate gyms for workouts. The parks really are the lungs of our city.

私たちの地域の公園 グリック公園のボランティアの様子を二年前にここに載せた。その直後、改修のために閉鎖された。この春、再オープンとなったが、かなりの植物が生き残らなかった。今、この公園は非常によくつかわれている。パンデミックで使えないジムの代わりとして、そして遊びとリラックスのできる戸外空間を求て。公園はまことに都市の肺である。

DSC01093

Our community group, Alliance for Kips Bay asked for volunteers to help maintain the park and I am always surprised how many people are willing to help in the parks, it is hard work, involves dirt and maybe bugs.

The Parks Department is struggling for funding and many parks were closed during the peak of the pandemic when all resources were devoted to trying to keep everyone healthy, including the park staff. They cannot maintain the parks on the budget the city gives them, it is up to the residents to fill in the gaps. The Partnership for Parks is helping to support the volunteers who are organizing community lead clean ups with training sessions. The Partnership and the corporate sponsors provided us with gloves, masks and they even gave us a tape measure to make sure we stayed 1.8m apart.

私たちのコミュニティグループ、キップスベイ連は公園の整備のために毎回ボランティアを募る。ちょっとしんどいし、土を扱うのに、それでもやりたいと考えている人がいかに多いか?いつも驚かされる。 地域公園は管理費調達の苦労に加えて、パンデミックのおかげで多くが閉鎖された。公園管理のスタッフや利用者すべての人の健康を考えてのことであった。

市の予算は公園維持に十分でなく、地域住民の助けなしには成り立たない。「公園パートナーシップ」プログラムがスポンサーのあるイベントでもってボランティアを支援している。市の公園局からは手袋の上にマスク、携帯消毒剤などが支給された。互いに1.8mを保つための巻き尺まである。

DSC01089

It turns out that almost every park in the city has a dedicated set of volunteers that weed, plant and lovingly tend these public spaces. The residents of every neighborhood can provide this kind of support, working together with the staff of the park. We posted about another volunteer group at Dag Hammarskjold Park, another neighborhood park, a few years ago.

都市にあるほぼすべての公園には、これらの公共スペースを除草、植栽、愛情を込めて世話をするボランティア集団がいる。住民はスタッフと協力しあって、このような支援を近くの公園にすることができる。お隣のハマーショルド公園のボランティアグループについても、以前このブログにのせた。

DSC01084

We painted one of the benches in the Pan-African flag colors, something that the parks department is trying to do in all the parks.  (Don’t look too closely!) I find weeding to be very therapeutic, so satisfying to get out those roots, just enough of a challenge, a bit of exercise and a good looking garden when you are finished.

ベンチも市からもらったペンキを塗る。なぜか知らないが、公園局は市のすべての公園のベンチをアフリカを連想させる色で塗りたいらしい。(細部をじろじろ見ないで!)わかってきたのだが、草抜きは小気味よく抜けるので、一種のサイコセラピーだということ。根が深くて大きいときは、ちょっとしたエクササイズになるのだが、終わった時、美しい庭が現れる。

DSC01114

Yesterday on a weekend bicycle ride we ran into a volunteer working in Carl Schurz Park and chatted  with her in front of a lovely flower bed by the Mayor’s mansion. (The highway running above Glick Park runs right under this garden).  We found out that she is a horticulturist and this flower bed is beautifully maintained by her as part of a conservancy group that receives donations from the community. She offered to come to our park and  give us guidance. We are  going to organize an event  for our volunteers. It will be a fun event! —–Come and join us, every park needs these volunteers !

昨日、週末の自転車遠足の途中、市長官舎の横にあるカールシュルツ公園の素晴らしい花壇の脇を通りすぎた。( グリック公園の上を通ていた高速道路は、ここではこの庭園の真下を通る)たまたまボランティアが働いているのを見つけて、ちょっとおしゃべりができた。彼女は、園芸の専門家で、地域住民の寄付を受けて、ある保存グループの一端としてこの公園の維持管理をしているらしい。我らのボランティアグループのために、わざわざグリック公園に指導に来てくれることになった。面白いイベントになりそう!—–皆さん、加わりませんか?  地域公園はどこでもボランティアを必要としてます。!

DSC01190

“This garden is cared for by a neighborhood volunteer.” NY parks department 「この庭は近所のボランティアによって世話されています」ニューヨーク公園局

 

Black Lives Matter ブラックライフマター

Black-Lives-Matter-Mural-Trump-Tower-Fifth-Avenue-NYC-2

Last Thursday  I was one of the lucky community members able to join in painting “Black Lives Matter” onto Fifth Avenue. The words fill one city block and face the Trump Tower, which has become something of a tourist attraction, ( no idea why) , Aimed at him…No, No. Hopefully this message will get through to those tourists who come to visit that building.

先週、幸運なことに第六コミュティーボードのメンバーは目抜き道路に「B…ブラック L…ライフ M…マター」とペンキ書きする企画に参加できた。場所はフィフスアベニューに面するトランプタワーの真正面、一ブロックにわたって大きく書かれた。この建物は、なぜか知らないけれど観光客の人気スポット。このメッセージが彼らに届くことを期待している。当てつけじゃないかって?とんでもない。

20200709_120904

The department of Transportation led the event with the mayor, his wife and other elected officials joining in to paint the bright yellow message. After straightening his tired back, the mayor stated ”Our city isn’t just painting the words on Fifth Avenue. We’re committed to the meaning of the message.”

この騒ぎはデ・ブラジオ市長と市交通局が企画したもので、市長夫人、選挙選出の議員などが参加した。疲れた腰を伸ばしたあとで、市長が演説。曰く、「我が市は単に黄色でこのことばを道路に塗ってみたというだけではない。私たちはこのメッセージの意味に傾倒しているのです。」

20200709_115629

This is one of 3 installations in Manhattan, all painted by volunteers. Members of all the Manhattan community boards were invited to help paint in this location, other spots are being organized by local groups with African American artists featured.  This work was professionally and beautifully done by the department of transportation, as you can see.

ここにあるのはマンハッタンに書かれた3か所のうちの一つで、マンハッタンコミュニティーボードはこの場所に招待されたが、他の2か所は地域のグループによって組織された。お気づきのように職業的正確さの美しい完成。型板無使用!!それもそのはず、アフリカ系アメリカ人のアーティストたちが起用された。

20200709_121453

I did not participate in any of the protests but I did want to show my support- it was a very mixed crowd in terms of race and age, black, white, brown, yellow, young, old; a pretty good representation of New York City.

これまでずっとプロテストに参加しなかったので、支持を表明したいと思っていた。野次馬や参加した人々は白、茶、黒、黄、老、若、男、女、全く良く混ざっていた。これぞニューヨーク市の断面。

20200709_120711

P.S. Later, the president of the USA who we believe naturally supports racial equality commented “the street was destroyed”

追伸, 後で合衆国大統領のコメントが発表された。曰く「路面が破壊された」

Pandemic クロノウィルス

DSC00953

For several years we have been organizing “parking day “once each year a car parking spot is used for a neighborhood park. It is a great way to take back space from the cars and remind us that the residents are the main characters in the city, but it is just one day a year.

この数年、私たちは通りの一車線を地域公園の一種と見立てて、毎年、市当局から道路を借りるイベントを企画している。パーキングデイと呼ばれ、駐車に使われてる空間を都市道路網から地域に返してもらい、町の主人公は車ではなくて、住民であることを思い出そうというお祭り。だが、残念なことに一日で終わる。

DSC00956

After the pandemic had closed restaurants for several months a group of restaurant owners on 2nd avenue asked Community Board 6 to use the street in front of their restaurants for outdoor dining for their customers. Traffic is reduced, the streets are empty, and the restaurant owners are desperate to get back to serving customers- their one stretch of Second Avenue provided jobs for 600 restaurant workers. Isn’t it a brilliant idea? Our community quickly supported this idea and it became reality throughout the city this week.

先日、このパンデミックのおかげで営業が出来なくなったレストランのオーナーたちが通りの一車線を使わせてもらえないかと第6コミュニティーボードに尋ねてきた。セカンドアベニュウー大通りに並ぶレストランはすべて閉まっているけれど、屋外なら営業が許されている。道路はガラガラで、もしレストランの延長として使えるなら、店をつぶさずに済む。セカンドアベニュウー沿いにある600件のレストランで雇用が再生される。すばらしいアイデア!!コミュニティーはすぐさまこのアイデアを支持して、それが今週、全市で実現した。

DSC00972

It is so fantastic to see this street being used for something other than parking cars or routing trucks that are racing to leave the city. In Manhattan only 22% of the population owns a car, so where do all those other cars come from?… outside of Manhattan. This brings a fundamental question; do we really need such wide streets? Possibly, the other way around… wide streets have been inviting unnecessary traffic into the city. It was more than two centuries ago that the street width and density were determined when carriages were the main transportation. I wonder if the city designers determined the street width and network by predicting the traffic of the future. We speculate, they just dreamed of European boulevards which were not for functional reason but a demonstration of  the power of monarchies. It is believed that the current street system is a highly functional design and contributed to the prosperity of American cities, but did we really need this width?

通りを車とトラックで埋め尽くすことの他に使われているのを見るのは素晴らしい。マンハッタンではたった22パーセントの世帯しか車を持っていない。では、道路に溢れる車はどこから来たのか?いうまでもなく外から来ている。この事実から、根本的な問いが浮かび上がる。本当にこの広い道路が必要なのか?もしかして、事実は反対なのではないか?道路が広いから、これ幸いと外部の車が集まってくるのでは。道路網を作った200年ほど前には、まだ馬車しかなく、大量の車の出現を予言して道路が設計されたはずはない。ヨーロッパの大都市のバロック的なブールバードにあこがれて、この道路網の密度と道幅が決められたにすぎないのではないか?それが都市の発展に寄与したと信じられているけれど、本当にそうなのか?これほど大量の車を都市の中に呼び込むことが必然であったのか?

DSC00967

Here you can try a thought-experiment. Imagine that the width of the street is double the current one, would it generate traffic and more prosperity? Probably the answer is that cars would pack the city until they reached a daily traffic jam, with polluted air and noise… an unsafe environment. The point is there must be a good balance, and it is something that can be designed and evaluated.

ひとつ簡単な思考実験。もし道路が今の2倍の幅があったら、渋滞も起こらず、都市もっと発展していていたであろうか?その答えはおそらく否定的… 道路渋滞が起こるまで車は増え続け、結局、今と同じ、だだし、生活環境はもっと悪くなっていたのではないだろうか?要するに、適切なバランスがあるはずで、それを計画し、設計しなければならない。

DSC00974

The wait staff have to navigate the bicycle lane, but so far the pedestrians, cyclists and restaurateurs have been sharing the street space.

ウェイターたちは自転車線を越えてテーブルに給仕しないといけないものの、歩行者、レストランオーナー、サイクリスト、みんなで通りを共有している。

DSC00971

In the past Community Board 6 had tried unsuccessfully to encourage pop up cafés on some of the smaller side streets but the pandemic has suddenly made taking over many parking spaces possible! We hope this will demonstrate the pleasure of using our public streets for other uses and that it will become a new norm in the city.

以前に第6コミュニティーボードは交通量の少ない通りの路上駐車場を排してポップアップカフェと呼ばれる路上オープンカフェを作ろうと頑張ってきた。しかし、このパンデミックは一挙に路上駐車を追い払う結果となった! 私たちの公道が車以外の用に使われて、その楽しさを見せつけることで、これからの都市の新しい標準になるのではないか?そうなりますように!

IMG_1063_2

Parking day a few years ago. One of 2 dozen sites. A play is going on. 数年前のパーキングデイ、市内数十か所のうちの一つ。素人劇の最中。

Cherry blossoms at Sakamoto 坂本の桜

tokyo+211

These days when you talk, you read, or listen all of the issues are filled with the virus. Let’s talk about something different. I found an unfinished post written exactly one year ago, about a small village in a valley 30 minutes from the west coast of  Shikoku island.—–

読むもの、聞くもの、話すもの、今はすべてウィルスで埋まっているから、違う話をしようか。何でもいいのだが、幸い、ちょうど一年前に書き始めてそのままになったポストがある。四国の東海岸から谷をほんの30分ほど上ったところにある寒村の話。—–

tokyo+209

We are in one of the many small valleys that open up to the coast. The next valley to the north recently became well known among Japan as an active village driven by the internet, Kamiyama.  You can keep going deeper and deeper into the valley until finally you reach the other side of Shikoku island through a narrow minor road where just one car can pass. This valley is much deeper than one in the last post. The road turns back and forth in what seems like an infinite number of times until you reach a tunnel at the top. This used to be a major access to the deeper part of the valley. Houses hug the road.

前回のブログで書いた土地は海に向かって小さな谷がいくつも開いている。今日は、その,中の一つに来ている。北に向けて一つ尾根を越えれば、インターネット産業を通じた町作りによって全国で注目されている神山町の谷がある。ここは前回のポストに載せた谷に比べずっと深く広い。谷の奥に向けて入ってゆくと、車一台が通れるマイナーな県道を経て、ついには四国の反対側に出る。県道からスイッチバックの道が山の上に向けて繋がり、これに民家がへばりついている。バイパスが来る前はこのつづれ折りが旧街道だったに違いない。

20190414_224052s

After the zigs and zags this view opens up. The houses on the other side of the valley are all old fashioned, the landscape has not been invaded by new industrial building materials, even thatched roofs are surviving. The same landscape was here 100 years ago. (How can people make a life here? Hard to imagine agriculture on this hill. A different time is passing.) It is a matter of time before the invasion will happen. Wind power turbines are visible at the ridge beyond.

つづら折りを上り詰めると、この景色に出くわす。向かいの山を見ると山腹にある民家は昔ながらで、まだ新建材の侵略を受けてない。その中には茅葺の家さえ見える。100年前もこうだったに違いない。(人々はどうやって生計を立てているのだろうか?猫の額の畑しか無いから耕作農業ではなさそうな。ここには他とは別の時間が流れているように見える。)しかし、新建材で埋まるのは時間の問題だろう。峰の上には、風力発電の大風車が見える。

20190414_223000s

It may not be an insult to say these houses are shabby, but in a sense beautiful. The materials are cheap corrugated metal and deteriorated wood, yet much better than the fake products which are artificially mimicking masonry. Human eyes are superbly created, you will notice it is not real. The newly developed fake products are durable, inexpensive and clean at the beginning, but they all soon become shabby and dirty and no character. Why not produce a new design respecting their own unique nature instead of mimicking? It is strange that we feel these houses are not so bad even comparing with a small old masonry shack. Yes the individual houses are not so good but not bad as a group. It may be similar that individual buildings in Manhattan may not be particularly beautiful , but collectively creating beautiful landscapes.

道路の両側の家々はかなりみすぼらしいと言って差し支えあるまい。奇妙なことなのだけれど、美しく見えないだろうか?トタンや朽ちた木の板が使われているのだが、新建材の外壁材で包まれた昨今の家にくらべるとずっと良いではないか?奇妙な言い方だけれど、「みすぼらしい、けれど味がある」。これらの家々の壁をレンガや石積みの絵を板にかいて木造の家に張り付けた、あの紛いもので張り替えたら、どう見えるだろうか?人の目は素晴らしく良くできていて、上手く真似ができたとしても、どうしても真似しきれない。一発で分かってしまう。新建材は確かに安くて丈夫、最初は清潔感いっぱいなのだが、経年で落ち着いた雰囲気、古さが持つ落ち着きに至ることはない。ひたすら「みすぼらしく、かつ、味のない」家に変化してゆく。それなら、真似ではなくて、初めからその材料にふさわしい新しい独自の表情を与えればいいではないか?ここにあるみすぼらしさは、とても不思議なのだけれど、それほど悪くないのではないか?数年前にここにイタリアで見つけた古い石小屋を載せたが、それと比べてそんなに悪くないような気がしてきた。ここにある家々は、この小屋とは比べるべくもないけれど、集合した景観としては悪くない。マンハッタンの個々の建物が取り立てて美しいわけではないけれど、全体としては美しいと言えるのとよく似ているかも。

20190414_222447s

Masonry buildings can be reborn when renovated even when very old, and are the basis for the continued history of the life in cities and villages. It is an open secret in Europe. Wooden structures can be maintained to some extent more than can believed, but there is a limit. If wooden structures cannot create a built legacy, many Asian towns will never be able to achieve a beautiful heritage. Probably we need to reconsider what is beautiful. Possibly it may not be the European concept, but surely not fake materials mimicking traditional materials.

本物のレンガや石で家ができれば、大昔の家でも少し手をかけることで味のある建物によみがえる、そしてそれが長年の内に町や村に蓄積される。それがヨーロッパの街の美しさの秘密だろう。木造でもかなりの事はできるけれど、それでも石やレンガ造のようにはいかない。しかし地震と湿気、資源の無さは、どうしても避けられない、そんな土地でヨーロッパの質を望むのは無理なのではないか?それならば、その条件に合うものを使って、デザインすればいいではないか?美しい建物、環境をつくるのに、石やレンガがどんな材料より本質的に勝っているということはないはずだ。もし石やレンガでなければいけないならば、それがないところは永遠に美しくしなれない。何を美しいとするか、そこから考え直さないといけないかもしれない。ヨーロッパのコンセプトと違うかもしれない、しかし少なくとも、真似しきれない紛い物に用はあるまい。

tokyo+205

Libraries in Mexico メキシコシティーの図書館

20200211_104154

The glass floor of the book shelves. 本棚の周りはガラスの床。

 

We are at a factory in Mexico city. An automation line is accommodated in this big space. You recognize the book shelves along the conveyor, a book manufacturer? Sorry it was a lie we are not in a factory. It is in fact a library which was built several years ago. This linear space continues straight for several hundred meters. The library is designed around this linear void.  The reading space is on either side between the void and the exterior windows, an ideal condition with light and views provided for the readers. The book shelves are hung in the void but never move. You go to the shelves to find your books through small staircases and come back to your seat. Mezzanine floors that contain only book shelves are sandwiched between the concrete floors of the reading spaces. Elevators stop at each floor as wheel chair users and the Librarians’ wagons need to access every floor. We realized this is not a typical library that we know very well.

今私たちはメキシコの、ある工場にきている。4、5階ある吹き抜けの大空間の中にオートメーションのラインが収まっている。よく目を凝らすと、コンベーヤーの中には本のようなものが次第に見えてくる。製本工場か?実は工場というのは大ウソで、数年前にできた図書館。大空間が数百メーター、一直線に伸びている。建物はこの大空間だけから成り立っていると言っても間違いにはならない。読書席はこの大空間を取り囲ように窓脇に配置されている。図書館の理想であるところの、明るい外光と素晴らしい眺望が全席に用意されるようデザインされている。書架はこの大空間に吊るされているが、決して動かない。書架へは、小さな鉄階段を使ってたどり着き、必要な本をとりだして席までもどてくる。書架しかない階が中二階のように、読書席のある階と互い違いに挟まれていて、そこへもエレベーターは止まる、でないと身障者や図書館員が本を動かすのが大変だから。なにやら、我々の慣れ親しんでいる図書館の在り方とだいぶ違うのでないかと気が付きだした。

DSC00517

Who wants to spend so much money to build a facility just for book reading? It is almost a cathedral for books. This is not the library we are used to .

本を読むということだけのためにこれだけの大がかりなデザインと構造に大予算を投じるだろうか?まるで本の聖堂のよう。地元の人が抱く、書物あるいは図書館の観念が私たちと違うのではないか?

DSC00523

It seems there is very little staff for such a large collection. Do readers return the books to the original shelf by themselves? If so, it will be big work for them and will they put them back in precisely the original location? In New York you are supposed to drop the book into a big basket or leave it on the desk not return it to the original shelf. We wrote that the ideal library has a flat single floor, but this is the other way around. What if you have many books to read in many genres? You have to go up and go down many times.

これだけの蔵書量に対して、図書館員が異常に少ないように見える。ということは読み終えた本は読者がすべて元の書架に返すのだろうか?でないと図書館員は大変だろう。もし読者が返すなら、いちいち階段を旅して返すのは大変に違いない。ニューヨークの図書館では読み終わった本は所定のかごに入れることになっている。いい加減なところに返されると、後で館員が整理するのはかえって大変になるし、それまで他の人が見ることが出来ないから。

前のブログで床が一続きなのが図書館の理想と書いたが、このシステムは全くその逆ではないか?読みたい本が何冊もあって、いろんなジャンルにわたっていたらどうするのだろうか?図書館中あっちこっち、登ったり降りたりしなければならない。

 

 

DSC00518

In front of the louvers is a reading area, avoiding the strong light, the garden is visible between the louvers. 読書席がルーバーの後に。強い光を避けながら、隙間から庭園が見える仕組み。

 

DSC00525

Exterior. This linear expression is more than 200m surrounded by garden. 建物の外観、これが同じ表情で200m 以上続く。庭園も一緒に並んで続く。

 

DSC00466

This looks like a high end restaurant. The surrounding garden is visible through the slot between the old building and the new. 高級レストランさながら。庭園の緑が新旧建物の隙間から。

Next day we went to a national library. Although it is different from what you imagine from “national” there is no check to go in and you traverse the building through several entrances. It was renovated from an older library which had 4 square gardens by adding large roofs.  Shelves and reading seats are laid out in the squares. Through the gap between the old building and the new roof, sun light and a view of the garden outside are visible. The only support of the roof is by a huge central columns. This structure should be quite expensive.

翌日、私たちは国立の図書館を訪ねた.「国立」からイメージする仰々しい門構えやチェックははなく、ぶらぶらと通り抜けできる。かつては外部だった大きな中庭がだろうか、巨大な屋根を載せて図書室にしたように見える。最も機能的な構成である平屋の土間に開架の本棚と読書テーブルが置かれている。これが4か所ある。古い建物の上には大きな欄間が出来て、外光を入れている。屋根は真ん中の4本柱以外は何も支えていない。これまた費用の掛かる大構造。

DSC00472

Small archive rooms are accessed from the corridors surrounding the big square reading areas. These archives were recently renovated with a very high quality of design. I have seen them published in magazines and books. These archives are respectfully dedicated to the original book owners and house their entire collection and it is a huge collection. This demonstrates a culture that has a huge respect to or an obsession with books. I speculate Mexicans return the books to their original location responsibly no matter if it is faraway and up many flights of stairs. That explains what it is like at the new library. I should have asked about this system.

この平土間の周りには回廊があって、その外には小さい図書室がならんでいる。これらを見ようと中にはっいってみた。新しいデザインで改修が近年あったらしく、非常に質の高いデザインなのには驚いた。どこかの建築雑誌で見たことがある。それぞれの図書室は一人の個人蔵書を保存したものらしい。膨大な所蔵量。各部屋ごとに元の所蔵者たちをたたえている。書物への大きな尊敬を目のあたりにした。メキシコには歴史的にそのような文化があったのではないだろうか?蔵書家に限らす、人々は読み終わった本は各人が責任をもって元の棚に返すのではないだろうか?それが前の図書館で起こっていることであれば説明がつく。尋ねればよかった。

DSC00473

a lot of spare time today. 暇そうな職員たち。

DSC00475

DSC00477

stacked book shelves-the floor is glass, hung from the ceiling without columns. Amazing craftsmanship of stainless steel. 書架は二階建て。床はガラスで天井から吊られている。柱無し. ステンレス細工は驚きの職人わざ

DSC00603

As you see, a mezzanine floor accessed through a small staircase is common in these new libraries. It seems to be the traditional way of designing a library and is an expression of their respect and affection for books, which is gone in Japan or New York where books are considered disposable or treated roughly.

書架は二階建てになっていて小さな階段で上階の書架にアクセスするのは昨日の図書館と同じ構成になっている。伝統的な図書館の構成で、それは人々の書物へ感受性、愛情、尊重を仮定しているように思われる。図書は消耗品になりつつある日本や、大事には扱われないNYではできない構成のように思われる。

DSC00648

The mezzanine is accessed through a stair case 階段をのぼって中二階へ

DSC00486

A dedicated space for Braille, audio booths are suspended from above. Yellow guide lines on the floor. 点字専用図書室。 吊られているのは音声利用の個室。床に白線。

DSC00492

Does it make sense to build such a beautiful library for people who can not see well? Probably the small shelves are to improve acoustics. The book collection is coming. 目の不自由な人のためにこれほどの美しい空間を作って意味があるのか?ちょっと不思議。小さい本棚のようにみえるのはおそらく反射音響の改善のためか?蔵書の充実はこれから。

 

There has been a debate if written language was developed in north and south America before the Spanish invasion. There has been a recent full de-coding of the 4written language in Maya civilization, but it seems that the Teotihuacan civilization did not need a written language. How come this love of books developed? It must be an interesting process.

Despite the horrible history of the Spanish invasion, it is interesting to see the many amalgams of native and Spanish cultures. Is this book culture a reflection of this amalgam?

スペイン人の侵略以前の北南米で文字文化があったか無かったか、議論になっているらしい。ごく最近、完全解読が終わったマヤ文明の文字の例はあるけれど、メキシコのテオティワカン文明はあまり文字を必要としない文明だったように思われる。それが、どのようにして、現在のこのような「書物愛」が持たれるようになったのか?とても面白い過程にちがいない。

スペインの侵略の詳細を知れば胸が悪くならざるを得ないけれど、先住文化とスペイン文化の融合した現在を見るのはとても素晴らしい。この書物文化もその融合の結果なのだろうか?

Hunter Point new Queens library ハンターポイント図書館

DSC00288

A new library designed by the star architect Steven Holl opened several  months ago in our neighborhood, well, the other side of the East River. A 15 minute ferry ride brings you to the east shore and into the middle of newly developed high rise housing. The library project started over 10 years ago and has finally became a real building. The unbelievably  long term for construction did not surprise us, we are also designing a library project for the City of New York. That project started with a walk though in 2014, and we are now still in the schematic design phase.

新しい図書館がイーストリバーの対岸にできた。スター建築家、スティーブン・ホールのデザイン。クイーンズ地区の数ある公共図書館のひとつ。マンハッタンからはすぐで、連絡船で15分。周りには最近開発された高層住居ビルが立ち並ぶ。10年前に計画が始まり、今やっと実物が建った。信じがたい遅さだが、別に驚きはしない。私たちも別の分館を今設計中で、2014年に初めて現地に立ってから5年も経つ。今やっと基本の骨子が決まったところで、この後も工夫と知恵を注ぎ込んで発展させるべく、膨大な作業の過程が待っている。

DSC00291.JPG

We were excited to see the completed project as we remember the very early stage of the façade from a decade ago and have been seeing this building under construction from the other side of the river for several years. It is very powerful. Randomly shaped big windows carve holes into the platonic boxy building.  It has such an abstract form, not friendly…  no entrance on the riverside (park side), a discreet entrance at the street side.

工事の様子を川の対岸に見つけて、建物の完成を待っていた。10年余り前に見たこの図書館の初期スケッチを覚えている。非常にパワフル。シンプルな箱に不定形な形をした大な窓が開けられている。抽象的で、とてもフレンドリーとは言えず、川側(公園側)には入り口はなく、通り側には見落とすほどの入り口が小さくあるのみ。

DSC00274DSC00290

The inside instead is quite complicated, probably intended to be a Piranesian space,  mesmerizing, with elements of dramatic skipping floors, bridges, staircases and  arches inspired by the historic visionary Italian architect, but actually also messy.  What you feel in the space is very different from what the photos give us, the photos cut many things out of the frame. The design is challenging not because of the unusual façade or Piranesian space, but by the goal of consolidating and unifying them at the same time. We can see that the architect was struggling to achieve both. We read that these elements are not very well organized and not well synchronized with the random openings on the façade. In every project you want to bring something new to the world that will be a challenge but this was super ambitious.

内部は逆に、非常に複雑で、イタリアの幻想的建築家ピラーネージの描いたような空間を意図したように見える。劇的なスキップフロア、その間に掛かる橋々、延々と続く階段、…ほとんどゴチャゴチャ。実際の空間はここに載せた写真から感じる印象とはだいぶ違う。写真はフレームの外にあるものを切り落とす。そのデザインは挑戦的だが、それは変わった外観やピラネージの内部空間だからというわけではなくて、それらを統合して一緒に成り立せようとしているから。それを達成しようとして格闘した様子が読み取れる。様々な要素が完全には整理されていないし、それらが不規則な窓の在り方と同調しきれていない。新しい美しさを生み出そうとする建築家にとってプロジェクト一つ一つが常に大きなチャレンジなのだが、この図書館は飛び切り野心的。

DSC00279.JPG

Probably it is just our recognition that many things may not have been intended initially. We speculate that originally some bookshelves were installed at more reasonable locations. The current  bookshelves are located in abrupt and somewhat disturbing ways, the circulation collides with them, and they steal the scene….

たぶん私たちの一方的な見方に過ぎないのだろう、それに当初意図されたことと違うことが設計過程で発生したのかもしれない。いくつかの書架はもとはもっと合理的なところに配置されていたのではないか?現行のレイアウトは唐突だし、動線と衝突するような邪魔なところに設置されているように見える。

DSC00284

We heard that the 2 skipping floors along the staircase used to have book shelves, but they were not handicap accessible; no elevator or escalator so the book were removed from those floors to somewhere else in the library. Books are probably not the biggest draw for the library, when we were there almost every table was full with people using their laptops.

我々のプロジェクトの図書館代表から聞いたのだが、スキップフロアの幾つかが車いすで行かれないところに設計されていて、完成後に書架がどこかほかのところに動かされたらしい。この図書館の場合、蔵書そのものは図書館の目玉ではないのかもしれない。確かに本を読んでいるというよりは自分のラップトップで場所だけを借りている人で一杯。

DSC00276

This library has 5  floors and maybe more depending on how to count the tiny mezzanines and each floor has a small floor area, the general reading rooms were divided into smaller branch rooms. 40 years ago, we were taught that the ideal library has one floor for librarians who return borrowed books, and organize…. they constantly move books from one shelf to another according to expanding or shrinking sections. Also you don’t want to be sent to the next floor at the end of a shelf by the sudden ending of the alphabet after feeling that the book your searching book is very near, and find no book like it when you get there and come all the way back to the original floor. Knowing this the architect chose this height to stand out among the developer high-rises that surround it. It is New York’s version of the Sydney Opera house with its prominence on the waterfront.

建物は5階建て、とはいえ、たくさんある小さな中二階をどのように数えるかによっている。一般読書室がいくつもの小さな部屋に細切れにされて、それらの地面からの高さが僅かに異なっている。40年以上も前だが、図書館の理想は広いフロアでできた一階建てだと教えられた。返却図書を抱えた図書館員が元の書架に返すのに階を行ったり来たりしないで良いように、そして、本を探している利用者が階を上がったり下がったりしないで良いようにという条件らしい。図書館は分類に従って増えたり減ったりする本に対応して、書架を増やしたり減らしたりしょっちゅうしているから、広くないと一つの分類グループが一階と二階に分かれてしまう。そのことを知りつつ建築家はこの高層図書館を提案したものとみえる。でないと開発業者が建てた高層ビルに囲まれてしまって見落とされてしまう。水際であることを利用して、目立った存在感を主張したかったのだろう、シドニーのオペラハウスのように。

DSC00293.JPGDSC00295.JPG

Probably it is too popular, which is a good thing….it is in the middle of a densely populated area. We recommend that this is the first building you visit in new York City, it is definitely one of the best public buildings in New York。

とはいえ、スキップして細切れになった各フロアが狭すぎるように見える。たぶん人気がありすぎて入館者が多すぎるのだろう。人口密度の高い地区のど真ん中だから。それは大変良いことなのだが…。このデザインはニューヨークの公共建築で最良の建築デザインの一つに間違いない。ニューヨークに来た友人たちに、どの現代建築を見るべきかと訊かれて、いつも困っててしまうのだが、この図書館は一番にお勧めに挙げられる。

DSC00294.JPG

Ford Foundation Open Houseフォード財団の公開

At this years New York Open House, a yearly event to see and experience New York buildings, Sandy was volunteering at the Ford Foundation building near the United Nations. The garden and their gallery are open to the public but many people did not know and took advantage of this time to visit.  Many people came.

今日はニューヨークオープンハウスの日。毎年この時期の週末にNYの普段は見られない建物群が公開される。今回は国連のちかくにあるフォード財団の建物でボランティアをした。この建物の一階の室内庭園とギャラリーは普段も公開されているが、ほとんど知られていない。

The volunteer’s role is to guide visitors and to explain the architecture. This opportunity to visit other areas was a courtesy provided by the Ford Foundation.  Not all areas of the building were open but we as volunteers received a quick tour through the upper levels overlooking the garden  showing us their goals and their activity. The foundation’s goal is to improve social justice and they are happy to remind the public of their mission.

今日はたくさんの人々が来ている。この機会はフォード財団の好意で実現したもの。ボランティアの仕事は来館者を歓迎して、この建物の説明をすること。来館者の安全にも気を留める。財団の活動が今後さらに一般の人々に知られるようにと、私たちは執務階にも案内された。財団の目指す使命はより良き社会的公正を実現すること。

My first reaction was simply “ wow!” and “ how lucky we are we can see the inside!” and “how lucky they are!”, they can work everyday in this gorgeous working environment….

中に入って襲われた最初の感動はただただ、わ~、こんな素晴らしい建物に入れるなんて!であった。次に訪れた感動は、ここで働く人たちは何とラッキーなんだろう、ということであった。そして次には何でこんなに豪華でありえるんだろう?ということであった。

Then my next reaction was a question “why is this so gorgeous?”  The construction cost would have been exceptionally high, and the use of this footprint in this expensive city is extremely generous…. There is not so much floor area, commercial buildings could never afford it unless this spaciousness and richness of finish created more business, like banks or art museums.  Banks need to show that they are safe and profitable. Art museums need to  show their art collection is authentic and a ”must see” they need to entertain art lovers with their space. Unlike banks and museums one of our clients doing research to fight a serious disease wants to spend the majority of their donations for their facilities and equipment and some money for decent spaces for their staff. How much do we value space and luxurious finishes? It is all relative.

法外に高額な建設費。さらに敷地の広さに対して小さな床面積で、許される面積を全部使い切ってない。さらに、事務デスクの大きさと、周りの空間の広さを見よ。もし商業施設ならば豪華さが更なる利益を生むのでなければ、あり得ない。銀行ならばここに金を預けるのがいかに安全で利益を生むか、という幻想を与えなければならないし、美術館ならば、展示作品がいかに正統であるかを印象づけて、その上で芸術愛好家を楽しませなければならないから、まあ納得がゆく。しかし、そうでない施設ならば異常に贅沢。例えば、難病研究所を運営する私たちの施主は寄付されたお金を建物に使うのはほどほどにして、病気の原因解明と治癒もたらす研究費に使いたいと考えている。どのくらいの豪華さが適当なのか?おそらく基準は存在しない。日本ならば建物にはお金を使わないだろう、だからたいてい見すぼらしい。

When we left the building, I was in a strange mood, a mixture of  happiness because of the experience and our good luck and at the same time, unhappiness, why can’t everyone have this environment? Don’t we all deserve this quality of working environment? Can other not-for-profit organizations like ” Doctors Without  Borders” which have noble missions have this office as their headquarters?

建物を去るときには何とも言えない複雑な気持ちを持たざるを得なかった。この豪華な環境を体験した幸福感と、一方でどうしてそれを私達は持てないのか?という素朴な疑問から来る不幸感。このような環境は私たちのような一般的な仕事にはもったいないのか?高邁な志を持つ他のNPO団体、たとえは、アフリカで飢餓や疫病に直面する環境で活動する「国境なき医師団」はこの労働環境を持つことが出来るだろうか?

I have no answer … but, yes, all office spaces ”should ” have this quality.

良い答えは思いつかない。……多分、あらゆるオフィスで働く人々はこのような環境で仕事ができる「べき」なのだ。